Aachen Graphene FLAGSHIP seminars

Thursday, January 16, 2020, 2 to 3pm

Tomás Palacios (MIT) on the topic: "From Transistors to Synthetic Cells"

The lecture will take place in the "Physikhörsaal" (28D001) in the physics centre of RWTH Aachen at Campus Melaten.

Abstract:
Two-dimensional materials enjoy a vast array of unique properties, from extreme thinness and mechanical
flexibility to amazing quantum physics. These properties will have a tremendous impact in future
electronics by enabling large area, high speed, ubiquitous sensing and processing. This talk will review
some of the recent progress on the use of graphene and other two-dimensional materials in these
applications. In particular, it will discuss state-of-the-art MoS and WSe transistors for ultra-low power 2 2
CMOS circuits [1-2], graphene-based chemical [3] and infrared sensors [4], large area devices for energy
harvesting [5], and a new generation of micro-systems that probe the limits of electronics.

[1] NanoLetters, 16 (2016) 7798-7806.; [2] NanoLetters, 15 (2015) 4928-4934; [3] Applied Materials
and Interfaces, 10 (2018) 16169-16176. [4] Heterogeneous Integration of 2D Materials and Devices on
a Si Platform, Chapter in Beyond CMOS Technologies for Next Generation Computer Design (2019),
Springer. [5] Nature (2019) https://doi.org/10.1038/s41586-019-0892-1

 

 

Tuesday, January 7, 2020, 12 to 1 pm

Prof. Barbaros Ozyilmaz from the National University of Singapore (NSU) gives a talk about "2D Amorphous Materials and other Research Efforts at the Centre for Advanced 2D Materials"

 

Tuesday, April 10, 2018, 12 to 1pm

Peter Bøggild of DTU Denmark gives a talk about "Graphene at the edge of perfection"

 

Friday, June 15, 2018, 1 to 2pm

Dr. Shu Nakaharai (NIMS & MANA) on the topic: "Polarity-Controllable Transistors on 2D Materials"

The lecture will take place in room S3 in building Otto-Blumenthal-Str. 2 (above the workshop) at Campus Melaten.

Abstract:
Two-dimensional (2D) materials such as transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) have been expected for future channel materials due to their atomically-thin and smooth surfaces, which can lead to reducing the short channel effects in the aggressively scaled CMOS technology. On the other hand, there remain some challenging issues of carrier doping, control of carrier type and transistor polarity. In this talk, at first, we will discuss how we can overcome the issue of carrier type control in TMDC semiconductors. Here, it will be reviewed that MoTe2, in contrast to MoS2, exhibits only weak Fermi level pinning at the Schottky junctions, and it can behave as both n- and p-type transistors depending on the work function of the contact metals. Finally, it will be discussed that MoTe2 can be expected to be the ideal ambipolar channel in a unique concept of polarity-controllable transistors in which the transistor polarity (n/p) can be changed by electrostatic gating.
 

 

 

Wednesday, June 5, 2018, 12 to 1pm

Dr. Shu Nakaharai (NIMS & MANA) on the topic: "Polarity-Controllable Transistors on 2D Materials"

Abstract:
Two-dimensional (2D) materials such as transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) have been expected for future channel materials due to their atomically-thin and smooth surfaces, which can lead to reducing the short channel effects in the aggressively scaled CMOS technology. On the other hand, there remain some challenging issues of carrier doping, control of carrier type and transistor polarity. In this talk, at first, we will discuss how we can overcome the issue of carrier type control in TMDC semiconductors. Here, it will be reviewed that MoTe2, in contrast to MoS2, exhibits only weak Fermi level pinning at the Schottky junctions, and it can behave as both n- and p-type transistors depending on the work function of the contact metals. Finally, it will be discussed that MoTe2 can be expected to be the ideal ambipolar channel in a unique concept of polarity-controllable transistors in which the transistor polarity (n/p) can be changed by electrostatic gating.